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CSPAN
Sep 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2012 5:00pm EDT
change in the united states and how it's been shifted pretty rapidly over time as the great state of nevada. obama is running ahead of though not nearly as far as he did in 2008. but it still will cut off on my monitor but you can see an incredible increase of nine percentage points for the share of eligible voters who are minorities according to the data between 2008 and 2012. that's a massive demographic tide against the republicans and you can see there's been a decline of five percentage points in the share of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of vo
CSPAN
Sep 13, 2012 12:00pm EDT
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
CSPAN
Sep 19, 2012 12:00pm EDT
of the united states, leader of the free world and so my question was how does he do it, how does he decide and make decisions? how does he govern? tom goldstein and "los angeles times" supreme court correspondent david savage diprete view of the supreme court new term starts october 1st. this one hour and 15 minute discussion was part of a forum hosted by the cato institute here in washington earlier this week. >> our conference concludes with a look ahead to october term 2012. the court's docket as of today is a bit sparse, but not without have to. indeed, were it not for last terms obamacare and the sv1070 cases you could say the coming term would be the term of the decade. the first to sittings the court will hear cases on property rights, racial preferences and higher education, and the fourth amendment as well as a follow-up to the class-action blockbuster from a couple years ago, wal-mart for nurses do. cato followed the cases as well as in several other but if granted would be high profile as well. challenges to section 5 of the voting rights act and the scope of the treaty power, f
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2012 12:00pm EDT
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2012 5:00pm EDT
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
are talking the. they are manufactured within the united states or elsewhere. .. each one of those elements are probably designed in multiple countries most likely manufacture the components in multiple countries. they were integrated components in multiple countries, and that becomes the particular product. any one of these tablets or computers or smart phones that you have has likely touched more than 40 countries along the way. is it really possible to talk about an indigenous manufacturing them as we are managing the risk? the distribution. we need to think about secure distribution channels that distribution of all of the multiple components coming into another component that then goes to market, and when we think about that distribution channel and that procurement channel, we need to give the vendors credit that they actually have vetted their suppliers and those distribution channels because they don't want counterfeit products getting to market, so we need to use their trusten channel partners, their value added resellers and or off of the vetted tables of gsa and at the end of the
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2012 12:00pm EDT
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2012 9:00am EDT
. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i first want to say oddly the congress of the united states should stay in sessioning sessie resolve the issue of sequesteration and other issues like the debt limit and the fiscal cliff we face. i'll vote against adjournment tomorrow. i'll say first that i think i differ with a lot of the colleagues and think we are capable of more cuts in the department of defense. i disagree in the mapper they'll be done through sequester, that it's going to fall disproportionally on weapons and equipment that are so vital to our fighting forces, but let me say, first, that i think perspectively, i would like to see cuts. i think the department of defense is far too top heavy. more admirals and ships in the united states navy, and it's that top heavy across the board in the other services as well. i think we ought to look at some of the permanent overseas military bases we have. 79,000 troops still in europe where they are spending our nato allies, spending less than 2% of the economy on defense. we're at 4.2%. south korea, 28,000 troops, we're at 4.7% of defense spend
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 12:00pm EDT
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, the homeowner would say how could something like this happen in the united states? mikey and chantell sackett our land owners. they bought in 2005 a half acre parcel of land in idaho on which they planned to build their dream home. they obtained necessary building permits, and they started construction in their home in the spring of 2007 by putting on to their lot a bit of gravel. three days after that, the epa and army corps of engineer agents came on to their property and told them that they had to stop building their dream home because they were violating the clean water act. when sackett asked the epa to the court to provide some sort of written explanation as to why the need a federal permit to build their home, they were given the explanation in the form of a compliance order issued by the epa under the authority of the clean water act. this compliance order charged the sacketts of having violated the clean water act and immediately restore their property to its alleged status come and make available to the epa at any moment access to their property and to the business records. and if t
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2012 5:00pm EDT
it, but the headline is, "life expectancy shrinks for less educated whites in the united states." and let me quote -- generally speaking, the trend for life expectancy in the united states and all over the world has been going up. and the goal of a good society and a strong health care system is to see that people live longer, healthier, happier lives. but as a result of the devastating attacks in a variety of ways on the working class of this country over a period of years, over a period of years, not just starting yesterday, this is where we are. let me quote from this article, and i hope people hear this because this is really shocking stuff. and i quote: "the steepest declines in life expectancy are for white women without a high school diploma who lost five years of life between 1990 and 2008." whose life expectancy went down by five years. this is astronomical. and going back to the article it says, "said jay oshanski, a public health professor at the public university of illinois in chicago and the lead investigator on the study published last month in 'health affairs,' "
CSPAN
Sep 10, 2012 5:00pm EDT
want to thank senator gillibrand for bringing this moment to the attention of the united states senate and the american people and thank senator rubio, senator durbin for being here. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years since that tragic event in which terrorists had the attention of the world in the olympics at munich. and it's hard to believe over the last 40 years we've experienced so much of the violence from extremists and terrorists, tomorrow we will commemorate the 11th anniversary of the attack on our own country, and we recognize that the only way that we can stand up to this type of extremism is to never forthe get. -- forget and dere-dedicate ourselves to do everything we can to root out extremists, to root out terrorists and to never forget the consequences of their actions. so i want thank senator gillibrand and senator rubio for the resolution that we passed in this congress, to let those who were victimized 40 years ago to know that we won't forget them and we continue to dedicate our efforts to root out this type of hatred, th
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2012 9:00am EDT
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
CSPAN
Sep 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
citizens of the united states. he credited churchill with influencing his ideas on foreign policy and the way he talked with the russian counter parts in years to come. then, a few years later, he see the influence of church hill's words and example on ronald reagan and margaret thatcher and the way they mute the special relationship forward. even gorbachev acknowledged the role of the speech in finding a way forward without resulting to directive war. what can it teach us here in the room? the soviet union is in war? in this age we have turned cynical toward the politician. we too often dismiss a speaker on either side as pulling something over on one of us. somebody who has a lot of say but not a lot to do. but i think the right speech, delivered by the right speaker, at the right time has the power with bringing the nation in to a being. as with the decoration of independents. he has the power to -- he warned hit hitler we shall never surrender. it has the power to aspire our enemies to change. ronald region speaking in berlin to tear down the wall to gorbachev, the berlin wall
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
of the united states or how inspired they are by the people of the united states, because i think that we have all seen people and may be blessed that walter cronkite and all the rest. they saw americans at their absolute best. yes, ma'am. of curious and these stories were quite extraordinary. has there been a similar book on reporters like bob who cover the pacific like you have on this story? >> knollwood there is a diet that i know that is thinking about doing the book. [laughter] will you buy it if i do it? >> it's a fascinating story in itself. >> the pacific war i think too often gets overlooked especially the journalism and all the rest were phenomenal reporters covering the pacific i still love homer. how did you get into doing at. tell us a little bit of the book. >> my buddies at georgetown university, for history buffs and world war ii devotees when mr. cronkite passed away i was struck by two things. one is instead of the usual jd e-mails that we exchange when people leave us it is pure reference that was the death of the response. then i was struck when few of the ovaries mentione
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2012 5:00pm EDT
the. he served forty-third solicitor general of the united states from june of 2005 until june of 2008. prior to the conversation of solicitor general he served as acting solicitor general for nearly a year, as deputy solicitor general for three years and seven years of service is the longest period of continuous service, in the nineteenth century. he argued 16 cases before the supreme court including the case with which we began this conference today. mr clement received his bachelor's degree from shore -- storage town university service and master's degree in economics from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school as supreme court editor of harvard law review. following graduation, and the u.s. court of appeals. and he went on to serve seat chief counsel of the subcommittee on the constitution and property rights is subject today is intriguing lead in title october term 2011, a constitutional moment. please welcome paul clement. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. great to see the cato institute. is an honor to be here at the podium presenting some th
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2012 12:00pm EDT
the coal industry in the united states losing as thousands of tens of thousands of jobs instead of pursuing the cleanest technology in the area of coal. my record -- chairman of the house administration. we got rid of the program. the former speaker gave us the savings of equivalence of carbon emissions of one car per year. we have the results in on the program i established which is waste energy. it produces enough energy to light 250 homes 3-year. it reduces that which would go to landfill by 5,000 tons and the number of car equivalence it takes off the street in terms of carbon emissions is almost 900. that is a pretty good record. bera: you are suggesting global warming change we are seeing may not be caused by man-made sources? lungren: my point is we don't know to what extent it is and what moves we would take on our own in the united states will have an effect. at the same time it makes good common sense to attempt to try to reduce carbon emissions where possible. >> moderator: you want to talk about climate change? bera: the climate is changing. we are seeing extremes happen. talk t
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2012 5:00pm EDT
on and have support and the energy of the people and the interest of the people of the united states. we have seen the program grow, and we have seen it grow into a healthy child. of this, to me, is a personal highlight that i will never forget. those are the things that i would have. >> the voice of captain george bond, great american character who it's been my privilege to kind of introduce and get people better acquainted with. >> it was greater by the time sealab 2 and sealab 3, but people rally behind i think we might see more than today but that was really the case. after they shut the program down, after sealab 3 at the tragic events around that which are really very much like a polyp 13. we all know apollo 13, the trip to the moon and how just barely kind of made it back. that was like sealab 3 instead of with a less happy any. and one that resulted in the investigation, at the end of the program, but the programs and did not and the fact that they learned a lot after this, about deep diving and deficit at the et
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22